Demon Possessed Man Healed

 

Three stories one event.

Matthew 8:28–34 (NIV)

Jesus Restores Two
Demon-Possessed Men

8:28–34pp—Mk
5:1–17; Lk 8:26–37

28 When he arrived at the other side
in the region of the Gadarenes, two
demon-possessed men
coming from the tombs met him. They were so
violent that no one could pass that way. 29 “What do you want
with us, Son of God?” they shouted. “Have you come here to torture us before
the appointed time?”

30 Some distance from them a large
herd of pigs was feeding. 31 The demons begged Jesus, “If you
drive us out, send us into the herd of pigs.”

32 He said to them, “Go!” So they came out and went into the pigs, and
the whole herd rushed down the steep bank into the lake and died in the
water. 33 Those tending the pigs ran off, went into the town
and reported all this, including what had happened to the demon-possessed
men. 34 Then the whole town went out to meet Jesus. And when
they saw him, they pleaded with him to leave their region.

Mark 5:1–20 (NIV)

Jesus Restores a
Demon-Possessed Man

5:1–17pp—Mt
8:28–34; Lk 8:26–37

5:18–20pp—Lk 8:38,39

5 They went across the lake to the
region of the Gerasenes. When Jesus got out of the boat, a man with an impure spirit came from the
tombs to meet him. This man lived in the tombs, and no one
could bind him anymore, not even with a chain. For he had
often been chained hand and foot, but he tore the chains apart and broke the
irons on his feet. No one was strong enough to subdue him. Night
and day among the tombs and in the hills he would cry out and cut himself
with stones.

When he saw Jesus from a distance,
he ran and fell on his knees in front of him. He shouted at
the top of his voice, “What do you want with me, Jesus, Son of the Most High
God? In God’s name don’t torture me!” For Jesus had said to
him, “Come out of this man, you impure spirit!”

Then Jesus asked him, “What is your name?”

“My name is Legion,”
he replied, “for we are many.” 10 And he begged Jesus again
and again not to send them out of the area.

11 A large herd of pigs was feeding on
the nearby hillside. 12 The demons begged Jesus, “Send us
among the pigs; allow us to go into them.” 13 He gave them
permission, and the impure spirits came out and went into the pigs. The herd,
about two thousand in number, rushed down the steep bank into the lake and
were drowned.

14 Those tending the pigs ran off and
reported this in the town and countryside, and the people went out to see
what had happened. 15 When they came to Jesus, they saw the
man who had been possessed by the legion of demons, sitting there, dressed
and in his right mind; and they were afraid. 16 Those who had
seen it told the people what had happened to the demon-possessed man—and told
about the pigs as well. 17 Then the people began to plead
with Jesus to leave their region.

18 As Jesus was getting into the boat,
the man who had been demon-possessed begged to go with him. 19 Jesus
did not let him, but said, “Go home to your own
people and tell them how much the Lord has done for you, and how he has had
mercy on you.”
20 So the man went away and began to
tell in the Decapolis  how much Jesus had done for him. And all the
people were amazed.

Luke 8:26–39 (NIV)

Jesus Restores a
Demon-Possessed Man

8:26–37pp—Mt
8:28–34

8:26–39pp—Mk 5:1–20

26 They sailed to the region of the
Gerasenes, which is across the lake from Galilee. 27 When
Jesus stepped ashore, he was met by a demon-possessed man from the town. For
a long time this man had not worn clothes or lived in a house, but had lived
in the tombs. 28 When he saw Jesus, he cried out and fell at
his feet, shouting at the top of his voice, “What do you want with me, Jesus,
Son of the Most High God? I beg you, don’t torture me!” 29 For
Jesus had commanded the impure spirit to come out of the man. Many times it
had seized him, and though he was chained hand and foot and kept under guard,
he had broken his chains and had been driven by the demon into solitary
places.

30 Jesus asked him, “What is your name?”

“Legion,” he replied,
because many demons had gone into him. 31 And they begged
Jesus repeatedly not to order them to go into the Abyss.

32 A large herd of pigs was feeding
there on the hillside. The demons begged Jesus to let them go into the pigs,
and he gave them permission. 33 When the demons came out of
the man, they went into the pigs, and the herd rushed down the steep bank into
the lake and was drowned.

34 When those tending the pigs saw
what had happened, they ran off and reported this in the town and
countryside, 35 and the people went out to see what had
happened. When they came to Jesus, they found the man from whom the demons
had gone out, sitting at Jesus’ feet, dressed and in his right mind; and they
were afraid. 36 Those who had seen it told the people how the
demon-possessed man had been cured. 37 Then all the people of
the region of the Gerasenes asked Jesus to leave them, because they were
overcome with fear. So he got into the boat and left.

38 The man from whom the demons had
gone out begged to go with him, but Jesus sent him away, saying, 39 “Return home and tell how much God has done for you.”
So the man went away and told all over town how much Jesus had done for him.

 

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. . . You of little faith . . .

Jesus uses these three words 13 times in 6 verses (NIV)

you of little faith

Matthew 14:22–31 (NIV)

Jesus Walks on the Water

14:22–33pp—Mk 6:45–51; Jn 6:16–21
14:34–36pp—Mk 6:53–56

22 Immediately Jesus made the disciples get into the boat and go on ahead of him to the other side, while he dismissed the crowd. 23 After he had dismissed them, he went up on a mountainside by himself to pray. Later that night, he was there alone, 24 and the boat was already a considerable distance from land, buffeted by the waves because the wind was against it.

25 Shortly before dawn Jesus went out to them, walking on the lake. 26 When the disciples saw him walking on the lake, they were terrified. “It’s a ghost,” they said, and cried out in fear.

27 But Jesus immediately said to them: “Take courage! It is I. Don’t be afraid.”

28 “Lord, if it’s you,” Peter replied, “tell me to come to you on the water.”

29 “Come,” he said.

Then Peter got down out of the boat, walked on the water and came toward Jesus. 30 But when he saw the wind, he was afraid and, beginning to sink, cried out, “Lord, save me!”

31 Immediately Jesus reached out his hand and caught him. “You of little faith,” he said, “why did you doubt?”

My Thoughts:

The first thought which comes to mind, I believe is what so many others say.  When Peter took his attention away from Christ, he began to sink.  Moreover, so much of that is true.  I would guess that most of us, when we feel we are struggling most, if we look back we had a gradual reduced role of Christ in our lives.

A second thought which hits me, one that Christ had even spoke of, is isn’t it amazing how the disciples had Christ right with them, in the boat and more, but still had troubling getting past all the limitations of trust we either are seemingly born with or learn as we grow into adults.

There is so much to gather from the Bible, but sometimes I really like to bring it down to its simplest form.  We can try to be a “Christian” all the time or simpler, we can always work on putting our faith in him, focusing on him and letting the outcomes take care of themselves.  Remember the number one commandment or greatest:

Matthew 22:37–38 (NIV)

37 Jesus replied: “‘Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind.’  38 This is the first and greatest commandment.

If we can just practice these – I truly believe we cannot worry about the rest.

Amen

 

1 Event 3 perspectives – Jesus Calms the Storm

 

Matthew 8:23–27 (NIV)

Jesus Calms the Storm

23 Then he got into the boat and his disciples followed him. 24 Suddenly a furious storm came up on the lake, so that the waves swept over the boat. But Jesus was sleeping. 25 The disciples went and woke him, saying, “Lord, save us! We’re going to drown!”

26 He replied, “You of little faith, why are you so afraid?” Then he got up and rebuked the winds and the waves, and it was completely calm.

27 The men were amazed and asked,
“What kind of man is this? Even the winds and the waves obey him!”

Mark 4:35–41 (NIV)

Jesus Calms the Storm

35 That day when evening came, he said
to his disciples, “Let us go over to the other side.”
36 Leaving the crowd behind, they took him along, just as he was, in the boat. There were also other boats with him. 37 A
furious squall came up, and the waves broke over the boat, so that it was
nearly swamped. 38 Jesus was in the stern, sleeping on a cushion. The disciples woke him and said to him, “Teacher, don’t you care if we drown?”

39 He got up, rebuked the wind and said to the waves, “Quiet! Be still!” Then the wind died down and it was completely calm.

40 He said to his disciples, “Why are you so afraid? Do you still have no faith?”

41 They were terrified and asked each other, “Who is this? Even the wind and the waves obey him!”

Luke 8:22–25 (NIV)

Jesus Calms the Storm

22 One day Jesus said to his disciples, “Let us go over to the other side of the
lake.”
So they got into a boat and set out. 23 As they sailed, he fell asleep. A squall came down on the lake, so that the boat was being swamped, and they were in great danger.

24 The disciples went and woke him,
saying, “Master, Master, we’re going to drown!”

He got up and rebuked
the wind and the raging waters; the storm subsided, and all was calm. 25 “Where is your faith?” he asked his disciples.

In fear and amazement
they asked one another, “Who is this? He commands even the winds and the water, and they obey him.”

 

 

Am I the lost sheep . . . ?

 

Matthew 18:10–14 (NIV)

The Parable of the Wandering
Sheep

10 “See that you do not
despise one of these little ones. For I tell you that their angels in heaven
always see the face of my Father in heaven.
[11]

12 “What do you think? If a
man owns a hundred sheep, and one of them wanders away, will he not leave the
ninety-nine on the hills and go to look for the one that wandered off?
13 And if he finds it, truly
I tell you, he is happier about that one sheep than about the ninety-nine
that did not wander off.
14 In the same way your Father in heaven is not
willing that any of these little ones should perish.

Luke 15:1–7 (NIV)

The Parable of the Lost
Sheep

15 Now the tax collectors and sinners
were all gathering around to hear Jesus. But the Pharisees
and the teachers of the law muttered, “This man welcomes sinners and eats
with them.”

Then Jesus told them this parable: “Suppose one of you has a hundred sheep and loses one of
them. Doesn’t he leave the ninety-nine in the open country and go after the
lost sheep until he finds it?
And when he finds it, he joyfully puts it on his shoulders and goes home. Then he calls his friends and neighbors
together and says, ‘Rejoice with me; I have found my lost sheep.’
I tell you that in the same way there will be more
rejoicing in heaven over one sinner who repents than over ninety-nine
righteous persons who do not need to repent.

 

 

The Parables of the Mustard Seed and the Yeast

 

I wonder of Dr. Erhman will consider this parable moot
because one of them does not talk about the yeast.  I do wish, maybe they do,
have a Bible that has similar stories like these next to each other.  Or,
maybe even intertwine them into one.  One loses the essence of how the Bible
was written, but it would be a great way to read the Bible.  I guess with our
computers, we can make our own.

Matthew 13:31–35 (NIV)

The Parables of the Mustard
Seed and the Yeast

31 He told them another parable: “The kingdom of heaven is like a mustard seed, which a man
took and planted in his field.
32 Though it is the smallest of all seeds, yet when it grows,
it is the largest of garden plants and becomes a tree, so that the birds come
and perch in its branches.”

33 He told them still another parable:
“The kingdom of heaven is like yeast that a woman
took and mixed into about sixty pounds of flour until it worked all through
the dough.”

34 Jesus spoke all these things to the
crowd in parables; he did not say anything to them without using a parable. 35 So
was fulfilled what was spoken through the prophet:

“I will open my mouth in parables,

I will utter things hidden since
the creation of the world.” 

Mark 4:30–34 (NIV)

The Parable of the Mustard
Seed

30 Again he said, “What shall we say the kingdom of God is like, or what
parable shall we use to describe it?
31 It is like a mustard seed, which is the smallest of all
seeds on earth.
32 Yet when
planted, it grows and becomes the largest of all garden plants, with such big
branches that the birds can perch in its shade.”

33 With many similar parables Jesus
spoke the word to them, as much as they could understand. 34 He
did not say anything to them without using a parable. But when he was alone
with his own disciples, he explained everything.

Luke 13:18–21 (NIV)

The Parables of the Mustard
Seed and the Yeast

18 Then Jesus asked, “What is the kingdom of God like? What shall I compare it
to?
19 It is like a mustard
seed, which a man took and planted in his garden. It grew and became a tree,
and the birds perched in its branches.”

20 Again he asked, “What shall I compare the kingdom of God to? 21 It is like yeast that a woman took and mixed into about
sixty pounds of flour until it worked all through the dough.”

 

 

The Day and Hour Unknown – Watchfulness

 

Matthew 24:36–51 (NIV)

The Day and Hour Unknown

36 “But about that day or
hour no one knows, not even the angels in heaven, nor the Son, but only the
Father.
37 As it was in the days of
Noah, so it will be at the coming of the Son of Man.
38 For in the days before
the flood, people were eating and drinking, marrying and giving in marriage,
up to the day Noah entered the ark;
39 and they knew nothing about what would happen
until the flood came and took them all away. That is how it will be at the
coming of the Son of Man.
40 Two men will be in the field; one will be taken
and the other left.
41 Two women will be grinding with a hand mill; one will be taken and
the other left.

42 “Therefore keep watch,
because you do not know on what day your Lord will come.
43 But understand this: If
the owner of the house had known at what time of night the thief was coming,
he would have kept watch and would not have let his house be broken into.
44 So you also must be
ready, because the Son of Man will come at an hour when you do not expect
him.

45 “Who then is the faithful
and wise servant, whom the master has put in charge of the servants in his
household to give them their food at the proper time?
46 It will be good for that
servant whose master finds him doing so when he returns.
47 Truly I tell you, he will
put him in charge of all his possessions.
48 But suppose that servant is wicked and says to
himself, ‘My master is staying away a long time,’
49 and he then begins to
beat his fellow servants and to eat and drink with drunkards.
50 The master of that
servant will come on a day when he does not expect him and at an hour he is
not aware of.
51 He will cut him to pieces
and assign him a place with the hypocrites, where there will be weeping and
gnashing of teeth.

Luke 12:35–48 (NIV)

Watchfulness

35 “Be dressed ready for
service and keep your lamps burning,
36 like servants waiting for their master to return
from a wedding banquet, so that when he comes and knocks they can immediately
open the door for him.
37 It will be good for those servants whose master finds them
watching when he comes. Truly I tell you, he will dress himself to serve,
will have them recline at the table and will come and wait on them.
38 It will be good for those
servants whose master finds them ready, even if he comes in the middle of the
night or toward daybreak.
39 But understand this: If the owner of the house
had known at what hour the thief was coming, he would not have let his house
be broken into.
40 You also must be ready,
because the Son of Man will come at an hour when you do not expect him.”

41 Peter asked, “Lord, are you telling
this parable to us, or to everyone?”

42 The Lord answered, “Who then is the faithful and wise manager, whom the master
puts in charge of his servants to give them their food allowance at the
proper time?
43 It will be
good for that servant whom the master finds doing so when he returns.
44 Truly I tell you, he will put him in charge of all his
possessions.
45 But suppose
the servant says to himself, ‘My master is taking a long time in coming,’ and
he then begins to beat the other servants, both men and women, and to eat and
drink and get drunk.
46 The
master of that servant will come on a day when he does not expect him and at
an hour he is not aware of. He will cut him to pieces and assign him a place
with the unbelievers.

47 “The servant who knows
the master’s will and does not get ready or does not do what the master wants
will be beaten with many blows.
48 But the one who does not know and does things
deserving punishment will be beaten with few blows. From everyone who has
been given much, much will be demanded; and from the one who has been
entrusted with much, much more will be asked.

 

 

The Parable of the Tenants

 

Matthew 21:33–22:1 (NIV)

The Parable of the Tenants

21:33–46pp—Mk 12:1–12; Lk 20:9–19

33 “Listen to another parable: There was a landowner who planted a vineyard. He put a wall around it, dug a winepress in it and built a watchtower. Then he rented the vineyard to some farmers and moved to another place. 34 When the harvest time approached, he sent his servants to the tenants to collect his fruit.

35 “The tenants seized his servants; they beat one, killed another, and stoned a third. 36 Then he sent other servants to them, more than the first time, and the tenants treated them the same way. 37 Last of all, he sent his son to them. ‘They will respect my son,’ he said.

38 “But when the tenants saw the son, they said to each other, ‘This is the heir. Come, let’s kill him and take his inheritance.’ 39 So they took him and threw him out of the vineyard and killed him.

40 “Therefore, when the owner of the vineyard comes, what will he do to those tenants?”

41 “He will bring those wretches to a wretched end,” they replied, “and he will rent the vineyard to other tenants, who will give him his share of the crop at harvest time.”

42 Jesus said to them, “Have you never read in the Scriptures:

“ ‘The stone the builders rejected

has become the cornerstone;

the Lord has done this,

and it is marvelous in our eyes’?

43 “Therefore I tell you that the kingdom of God will be taken away from you and given to a people who will produce its fruit. 44 Anyone who falls on this stone will be broken to pieces; anyone on whom it falls will be crushed.” 

45 When the chief priests and the Pharisees heard Jesus’ parables, they knew he was talking about them. 46 They looked for a way to arrest him, but they were afraid of the crowd because the people held that he was a prophet.

 

Mark 12:1–12 (NIV)

The Parable of the Tenants

12:1–12pp—Mt 21:33–46; Lk 20:9–19

12 Jesus then began to speak to them in parables: “A man planted a vineyard. He put a wall around it, dug a pit for the winepress and built a watchtower. Then he rented the vineyard to some farmers and moved to another place. At harvest time he sent a servant to the tenants to collect from them some of the fruit of the vineyard. But they seized him, beat him and sent him away empty-handed. Then he sent another servant to them; they struck this man on the head and treated him shamefully. He sent still another, and that one they killed. He sent many others; some of them they beat, others they killed.

“He had one left to send, a son, whom he loved. He sent him last of all, saying, ‘They will respect my son.’

“But the tenants said to one another, ‘This is the heir. Come, let’s kill him, and the inheritance will be ours.’ So they took him and killed him, and threw him out of the vineyard.

“What then will the owner of the vineyard do? He will come and kill those tenants and give the vineyard to others. 10 Haven’t you read this passage of Scripture:

“ ‘The stone the builders rejected

has become the cornerstone;

11 the Lord has done this,

and it is marvelous in our eyes’?”

12 Then the chief priests, the teachers of the law and the elders looked for a way to arrest him because they knew he had spoken the parable against them. But they were afraid of the crowd; so they left him and went away.

 

Luke 20:9–19 (NIV)

The Parable of the Tenants

20:9–19pp—Mt 21:33–46; Mk 12:1–12

He went on to tell the people this parable: “A man planted a vineyard, rented it to some farmers and went away for a long time. 10 At harvest time he sent a servant to the tenants so they would give him some of the fruit of the vineyard. But the tenants beat him and sent him away empty-handed. 11 He sent another servant, but that one also they beat and treated shamefully and sent away empty-handed. 12 He sent still a third, and they wounded him and threw him out.

13 “Then the owner of the vineyard said, ‘What shall I do? I will send my son, whom I love; perhaps they will respect him.’

14 “But when the tenants saw him, they talked the matter over. ‘This is the heir,’ they said. ‘Let’s kill him, and the inheritance will be ours.’ 15 So they threw him out of the vineyard and killed him.

“What then will the owner of the vineyard do to them? 16 He will come and kill those tenants and give the vineyard to others.”

When the people heard this, they said, “God forbid!”

17 Jesus looked directly at them and asked, “Then what is the meaning of that which is written:

“ ‘The stone the builders rejected

has become the cornerstone’?

18 Everyone who falls on that stone will be broken to pieces; anyone on whom it falls will be crushed.”

19 The teachers of the law and the chief priests looked for a way to arrest him immediately, because they knew he had spoken this parable against them. But they were afraid of the people.

 

 

Jesus Feeds Five Thousand . . .

I like posting stories from the Bible which appear in more than one Gospel.  I find it makes the story more rich, interesting and I actually learn more.  Some don’t like the differences, I like noticing them.  When I read the independently, I never notice a difference.

Matthew 14:13–21 (NIV)

Jesus Feeds the Five Thousand

13 When Jesus heard what had happened,
he withdrew by boat privately to a solitary place. Hearing of this, the
crowds followed him on foot from the towns. 14 When Jesus
landed and saw a large crowd, he had compassion on them and healed their
sick.

15 As evening approached, the
disciples came to him and said, “This is a remote place, and it’s already
getting late. Send the crowds away, so they can go to the villages and buy
themselves some food.”

16 Jesus replied, “They do not need to go away. You give them something to
eat.”

17 “We have here only five loaves of
bread and two fish,” they answered.

18 “Bring them here to me,” he said. 19 And he
directed the people to sit down on the grass. Taking the five loaves and the
two fish and looking up to heaven, he gave thanks and broke the loaves. Then
he gave them to the disciples, and the disciples gave them to the people. 20 They
all ate and were satisfied, and the disciples picked up twelve basketfuls of
broken pieces that were left over. 21 The number of those who
ate was about five thousand men, besides women and children.

Mark 6:30–44 (NIV)

Jesus Feeds the Five
Thousand

 

30 The apostles gathered around Jesus
and reported to him all they had done and taught. 31 Then,
because so many people were coming and going that they did not even have a
chance to eat, he said to them, “Come with me by
yourselves to a quiet place and get some rest.”

32 So they went away by themselves in
a boat to a solitary place. 33 But many who saw them leaving
recognized them and ran on foot from all the towns and got there ahead of
them. 34 When Jesus landed and saw a large crowd, he had
compassion on them, because they were like sheep without a shepherd. So he
began teaching them many things.

35 By this time it was late in the
day, so his disciples came to him. “This is a remote place,” they said, “and
it’s already very late. 36 Send the people away so that they
can go to the surrounding countryside and villages and buy themselves
something to eat.”

37 But he answered, “You give them something to eat.”

They said to him,
“That would take more than half a year’s wages! Are we to go and spend that
much on bread and give it to them to eat?”

38 “How many loaves do you
have?”
he asked. “Go and see.”

When they found out,
they said, “Five—and two fish.”

39 Then Jesus directed them to have
all the people sit down in groups on the green grass. 40 So
they sat down in groups of hundreds and fifties. 41 Taking
the five loaves and the two fish and looking up to heaven, he gave thanks and
broke the loaves. Then he gave them to his disciples to distribute to the
people. He also divided the two fish among them all. 42 They
all ate and were satisfied, 43 and the disciples picked up
twelve basketfuls of broken pieces of bread and fish. 44 The
number of the men who had eaten was five thousand.

Luke 9:10–17 (NIV)

Jesus Feeds the Five
Thousand

 

10 When the apostles returned, they
reported to Jesus what they had done. Then he took them with him and they
withdrew by themselves to a town called Bethsaida, 11 but the
crowds learned about it and followed him. He welcomed them and spoke to them
about the kingdom of God, and healed those who needed healing.

12 Late in the afternoon the Twelve
came to him and said, “Send the crowd away so they can go to the surrounding
villages and countryside and find food and lodging, because we are in a
remote place here.”

13 He replied, “You give them something to eat.”

They answered, “We
have only five loaves of bread and two fish—unless we go and buy food for all
this crowd.” 14 (About five thousand men were there.)

But he said to his
disciples, “Have them sit down in groups of about
fifty each.”
15 The disciples did so, and everyone sat
down. 16 Taking the five loaves and the two fish and looking
up to heaven, he gave thanks and broke them. Then he gave them to the
disciples to distribute to the people. 17 They all ate and
were satisfied, and the disciples picked up twelve basketfuls of broken
pieces that were left over.

John 6:1–15 (NIV)

Jesus Feeds the Five
Thousand

6 Some time after this, Jesus crossed to the far shore
of the Sea of Galilee (that is, the Sea of Tiberias), and a
great crowd of people followed him because they saw the signs he had
performed by healing the sick. Then Jesus went up on a
mountainside and sat down with his disciples. The Jewish
Passover Festival was near.

When Jesus looked up and saw a
great crowd coming toward him, he said to Philip, “Where
shall we buy bread for these people to eat?”
He
asked this only to test him, for he already had in mind what he was going to
do.

Philip answered him, “It would take
more than half a year’s wages to buy enough bread for each one to have a
bite!”

Another of his disciples, Andrew,
Simon Peter’s brother, spoke up, “Here is a boy with five
small barley loaves and two small fish, but how far will they go among so
many?”

10 Jesus said, “Have the people sit down.” There was plenty of grass in that
place, and they sat down (about five thousand men were there). 11 Jesus
then took the loaves, gave thanks, and distributed to those who were seated
as much as they wanted. He did the same with the fish.

12 When they had all had enough to
eat, he said to his disciples, “Gather the pieces
that are left over. Let nothing be wasted.”
13 So they
gathered them and filled twelve baskets with the pieces of the five barley
loaves left over by those who had eaten.

14 After the people saw the sign Jesus
performed, they began to say, “Surely this is the Prophet who is to come into
the world.” 15 Jesus, knowing that they intended to come and
make him king by force, withdrew again to a mountain by himself.